20th Century Propaganda

If you were unable to join us for our synchronous class, please watch the video and answer all questions in the YouTube comment box or via email.

AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS  MEETING on March 23

  1. My experiences in Italy and Israel
  2. Feedback on LEAP 2 and getting ready to submit LEAP 3
  3. Piktochart demo for LEAP 3
  4. Museum of Public Relations: Timeline of Propaganda
  5. Review COM416’s critical analysis of THE WALL
  6. Propaganda in 20th century US: Renee’s approach to critical reading the FOUR FREEDOMS with Kami Chrome
  7. VIEW AND DISCUSS “Four Freedoms” speech and Norman Rockwell’s art
  8. Preview required activities for next week AND end of semester

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE March 30 at 7 p.m.

  1. LISTEN: Democratic Activist Says Donald Trump Fits Demagogic Mold. NPR.
  2. READ AND POST:  Read  Chapter 6,  We Are All Americans Now? from David Welch, Propaganda: Power and Persuasion (pp. 189 – 200). After reading, select a powerful quote from the chapter along with an image of your choice and  upload it to our Padlet Wall. Be sure to put your name on your contribution.
  3. READ AND COMMENT. Select at least two of the articles below and use Kami Chrome to highlight, comment and annotate. Demonstrate your critical reading skills through digital annotation. Be sure that at least three of your annotations include a summary, a comment and a question. Then compose four tweets to capture some of the key ideas you learned from reading, using the hashtag #COM416.

COMING UP!

DUE: LEAP 3 March 30

…Two more quizzes…

DUE: LEAP 4 May 4

Week 7

Thursday, March 9, 2017

War propaganda, disinformation and fake news. Renee is lecturing in Rome, Italy this week on the topic of “fake news, propaganda and digital media literacy.”  We won’t have a “live” class tonight. Instead, please view the 30-minute screencast video below. If you have questions about LEAP 3 or activities, tweet Renee to get information. See you on March 23!

NEXT WEEK: Spring BREAK

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE Thursday, March 23 at 7 p.m. 

  1. Review and discuss LEAP 3 project 
  2. Take the Week 7 quiz here. It will be open between March 9, Thursday 6 PM to March 12th, Sunday, 6 PM.
  3. READ: After reading, offer a Flipgrid video comment on one big idea from your reading of: Kimble, James. (2015). The Illustrated Four Freedoms: FDR, Rockwell, and the Margins of the Rhetorical Presidency. Presidential Studies Quarterly 45(1), 46 – 69.
  4. READ and DISCUSS. After reading, answer the questions in the Docent EDU prompt questions:  Gilsinian, Kathy (2014, November 26). The Meaning of Thanksgiving, as Told through Cold War Propaganda. The Atlantic.
  5. VIEW & DISCUSS: U.S. Government (1962). The Wall. Film.  As you view, see if you can identify techniques which make this Cold War propaganda effective. Compose one prompt that identifies the specific communication strategy in use.

COMING UP!

Happy Spring Break!

Next Class: March 23, 7 PM

LEAP 3 : Due  March 30

Week 6


We explore the relationship between patriotism and propaganda

If you didn’t participate in the live class, please watch the class video below and then make a text or video comment after you analyze one of the sports propaganda videos (Group 1 or 2).

AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS ORIENTATION MEETING on March 2

  1. Student-produced LEAP 2 Videos
  2. VIEW: View All that We Share, which was broadcast on Danish TV in 2016. How might knowledge of the political context of Denmark (and Europe more generally) shape interpretation and critical analysis of this message?
  3. Review your tweets on propaganda and patriotism & your video annotation
  4. Crowdsourcing Bernays Propaganda: Key Ideas
  5. Critically analyze 2 media messages with the Media Literacy Remote Control/Smartphone
    1. GROUP 1 Paid Patriotic Propaganda 
    2. GROUP 2: Patriotism and Propaganda
  6. Preview required activities for next week

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE March 9 at 7 p.m. 

  1. VIEW AND COMMENT. View at least one of the LEAP 2 videos created by your peers and tweet a comment/reaction. Be sure to use the #COM416 hashtag and the @username of the person whose work you viewed.
  2. READ AND ANNOTATE. Read the short article at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum website on Nazi Propaganda. Use DocentEDU digital annotation to summarize and comment on what you learn. Be sure to make at least 2 comments. Then choose an additional article from the list at the bottom of the page to read.
  3. EXPLORE and TWEET. Spend 45-60 minutes exploring Writing the News and Defining the Enemy, part of an interactive media exhibit from The State of Deception. Be sure to click the “Explore in Depth” sections (located in the red boxes). After you have explored the website, compose 2 tweets to capture the most interesting ideas you learned. Be sure to use the #COM416 hashtag so we can see them.
  4. READ: Welch, David (2013). Chapter 3 & 5 Your Country Needs You (pp. 79 – 112). and Chapter 5. Know Your Enemy (pp. 151 – 188). Propaganda: Power and Persuasion. London: The British Library.
  5. VIEW: Watch Forbidden Films (2015), directed by Felix Moeller (It’s available in SD for $3.99 from iTunes.) This film takes a close look at Nazi entertainment films, 40 of which are still banned in Germany. As you view, take at least one screenshot of an image from the film.
  6. WRITE: Compose a blog post of under 250 words that answers the question: In the 21st century, should Nazi propaganda films still be banned? Why or why not?  Be sure to use information you learned from this week’s readings and viewing and embed at least one image in your blog post.

COMING UP!

Next class: Thursday, March 9

Week 5

“From an early age, learn to take care of yourself.” — 20th century Soviet propaganda

We are exploring beneficial propaganda that aims to improve society and inspire individuals to take action.

If you were unable to participate in the live synchronous class, watch the video and make a text or video comment in YouTube responding to the questions we explored.

AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS ORIENTATION MEETING on February 23

  1. Beneficial propaganda: From One Second to the Next: Your ANT & DocentEDU Annotations. How does beneficial propaganda affect you?
  2. Emotional appeals: Could an ad like this ever be shown in the U.S.?
  3. Some questions for discussing the readings:
    1. Why is beneficial propaganda called “soft propaganda”? What are the origins of this form of propaganda? Who created it and for what purposes?
    2. Why did the Czechoslovak Community Party design matchbox labels as a form of soft propaganda after the founding of the country in 1947?
    3.   Who was Edward Bernays and why is he called the “father of modern propaganda”? What was his breakthrough campaign in 1929?
    4. What is the origin of the “March of Dimes” campaign and what make it so effective?
    5. How did counter-propaganda about children’s MMR vaccination impact Britain?
    6. What are the ten steps needed to critically analyze propaganda? Which concepts are most important?
    7. What specific characteristics of images make them so effective as a propaganda tool?
  4. Critically analyze three propaganda examples with the Media Literacy Remote Control/Smartphone
  5. Progress report on LEAP 2: Critically Analyzing Propaganda (due March 2)
  6. Preview required activities for next week

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE March 2at 7 p.m. 

1. READ and TWEET: Read David Welch on propaganda and patriotism by choosing one of the chapters below. Then compose a minimum of three tweets to concisely summarize key ideas and information  that you learned. At least one Tweet should make a connection between what you learned and the present day. (NOTE: Tweets will be graded for quality.)

Welch, David (2013). Chapter 2. One People, One Nation, One Leader (pp. 41 – 78). Propaganda: Power and Persuasion. London: The British Library OR Welch, David. (2012). Propaganda for Patriotism and Nationalism. British Library.

bernays-book2. READ, SUMMARIZE and RESPOND: We’re crowdsourcing our reading of Edward Bernays’ classic book, Propaganda. Learn how to complete this assignment here. 

Bernays, Edward (1928). Propaganda. New York: Ig Publishing.

3. VIEW and ANNOTATE: Watch the student-produced video, Schools of Thought: Nationalistic Propaganda in History Textbooks. As you view, identify a key idea by making two  annotations. In your first annotation, summarize a key idea in your own words. In a second annotation, comment by considering how an idea presented in the video is connected to both the past and the present.

4. VIEW: View All that We Share, which was broadcast on Danish TV in 2016. How might knowledge of the political context of Denmark (and Europe more generally) shape interpretation and critical analysis of this message?

COMING UP!

Next class: Thursday, March 2

DUE: LEAP 2 March 2

smartphone

Week 4

We’re discussing how propaganda is part of marketing and promotion and reflecting on its intended and unintended consequences. If you did not participate in the live conversation, please view the video and contribute a video or text comment on the YouTube comment thread.

screenshot-2017-02-16-17-46-11AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS ORIENTATION MEETING on February 16

  1. Discuss: Fake News in Movie Promotion
  2. Review Tweets on Trust Me, I’m Lying: What themes are evident?
  3. Preview LEAP 2: Critically Analyzing Propaganda DUE March 2
  4. View and discuss: Analyzing ISIS Propaganda by Catherine
  5. Crowdsourcing key ideas in Trust Me, I’m Lying
  6. Respond to Ryan Holiday’s book, Trust Me, I’m Lying. Topics for discussion:
    1. Why does Holiday call all web content “blogs”?
    2. What is the “pageview imperative”?
    3. What is “trading up the chain”?
    4. Why is web content that is overstated, polarizing, and incomplete so effective for marketing and promotional purposes?
    5. What does Holiday mean when he says, “Blogs are built to be sold”?
    6. Ryan Holiday lies to the media to get attention. But he also recognizes that the excesses of the modern blogosphere are “too easy” to exploit. What are some of the tricks that he used to get attention?
    7. What are some of the short-term and long-term consequences of such strategies?
    8. What does Ryan Holiday think is the solution to the problem of fake news?
    9. Given his background and experience, is Ryan Holiday trustworthy in his description of his work and activities in public relations? Why or why not?
    10. What questions do you have after reading this book?
  7. Renee comments on your Flipgrid responses, blog posts on Trust Me, Quiz 1 and LEAP 1
  8. Preview required activities for next week

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE Thursday, Feb 23 at 7 p.m. 

We are examining the ways in which propaganda may be beneficial to society. 

  1. VIEW AND DISCUSS. View the film, From One Second to the Next, produced in 2013 by director Werner Herzog, and offer a minimum of two digital annotations to comment on the film, responding to these two questions: What different feelings do you experience as you move through the film? What techniques are used to evoke emotion and create feelings of identification?
  2. READ AND COMMENT. Establish an account at DocentEDU, which will allow us to engage in collaborative annotation of digital documents. Use the class code ukwz and sign in with a (non-URI) Google ID. You must install the Extension to use this tool in your browser. You will see the document by Ian Crouch, Why AT&T is Talking about Texting and Driving from The New Yorker Magazine. Read the article and answer the questions shown.
  3. CHOOSE ONE TO READ: Make a choice of the following materials and, after reading, describe some key ideas that you learned on the MUUT Discussion Board, Response to Readings, Week 5. 

4. OPTIONAL. Explore the Do Something. website to learn about a fun digital media tool that helps people take positive social action to make a difference on issues that matter to them.

COMING UP!

Next class: Thursday, February 23 7 p.m. 

DUE: LEAP 2 March 2

screenshot-2017-02-16-17-43-27

Week 3

Our theme this week is “Understanding Virality.” If you did not participate in the live chat, you must watch the video and make a (text or video) comment responding to the questions discussed in class on the YouTube page.

AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS ORIENTATION MEETING on February 9

  1. Reflections on LEAP 1
  2. Review Tweets on the readings: What themes are evident?
  3. Response to readings. How many can you answer?
    1. What is virality? What factors contribute to the viral spread of content?
    2. What techniques were used in KONY 2012 to activate emotions? To respond to audience needs? To simplify information? To attack opponents?
    3. Why did people share the KONY 2012 video with the people in their social networks?
    4. What specific techniques are terrorists using to advance their goals using social media?
    5. What are some similarities between the telegraph and social media in the context of global communication?
    6. What is homophily and how does it support the spread of propaganda?
    7. What are some examples of how ISIS propagandists mimic Hollywood and videogames?
    8. What is RT and what are “troll factories”?
    9. How does Facebook affect national and international public policy debates?
    10. Can social media networks be policed to regulate violent extremism? Why or why not?
  4. Renee’s comments on video annotation of Kony 2012.
    1. TEAM 1 KONY 2012.
    2. TEAM 2 KONY 2012.
    3. TEAM 3 KONY 2012.
  5. Preview required activities for next week

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE Thursday, Feb 16 at 7 p.m. 

  1. QUIZ ON WEEK 3 READINGS. This open-book quiz tests your comprehension of the readings. The quiz will open on Friday at 9 am and remain open until Sunday at 9 p.m. The Quiz is Now Closed.
  2. READ and COMMENT ON LEAP 1. Read the work of one student in this class (see the Class Roster) and offer some warm feedback using Twitter.
  3. READ AND COMMENT.
    1. Comment and Connect on Flipgrd. As a class, we’ll all read the opening and closing chapters of Ryan Holiday’s book as a class (see the chapters shown below). After reading, compose a Flipgrid comment where you (a) summarize a couple of key ideas that you learned and (b) make a connection to your life and/or current or recent past events. Finally, (c) view at least one comment from a peer and respond to his or her ideas.
    2. Summarize Two Chapters. As individuals, we will read some assigned chapters of Ryan Holiday’s book (click here to see the chapter you have been assigned). After reading your 2 assigned chapters, compose a detailed summary of the main ideas and post it to your blog.
    3. Synthesize and Share an Opinion. After reading Ryan Holiday, compose two Tweets. In one, you offer a synthesis of the big ideas you learned from Ryan Holiday an in another Tweet you share an opinion about what you have read. Be sure to use the hashtag #COM416 and “like” at least one Tweet contributed by a peer.

READINGS to complete for WEEK 4: Promotion and Marketing as Propaganda

READ: Ryan (2012). Trust Me, I’m Lying. New York: Pearson. See the specific chapters you are assigned to read here. 

COMING UP!

Next class: Thursday, February 16 7 p.m. 

DUE: LEAP 2 March 2

Week 2

We explore the definitions and history of propaganda.

Watch the recorded class here:

AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS ORIENTATION MEETING on February 2

  1. Review and discuss the film, “Look Who’s Back”
  2. Review Week 1 class participation: MUUT discussion, Video Annotation, and Flipgrid
  3. Defining propaganda: PPT slides – Week 2
  4. Response to readings. How many can you answer?
    1. What is the difference between agitative vs integrative propaganda?
    2. What is white, gray and black propaganda? What is the “big lie”?
    3. What is a video news release?
    4. What is disinformation? What is facilitative communication?
    5. What is the relationship between education and propaganda?
    6. What are some of the seven propaganda devices developed by the IPA?
    7. What are the ABC’s of propaganda analysis?
    8. In what context did the word “propaganda” originate?
    9. Why was radio so effective as a form of propaganda in the 1930s?
    10. What is the relationship between censorship and propaganda?
  5. Review expectations for LEAP 1 due February 9
  6. Preview homework and class participation activities for next week

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE Thursday, Feb 9 at 7 p.m. 

  1. Read and Tweet. As you read the assigned readings for Week  3 (links are available below), compose a minimum of 3 tweets to summarize a key idea in a concise way, using the hashtag #COM416. Review the tweets of other students and “like” at least one.
  2. VIEW and ANNOTATE: Kony 2012. Apply your growing knowledge of propaganda to analyze the film, Kony 2012, directed by Jason Russell. Each team member contributes a minimum of 3 annotations while viewing. This should enable you to make a connection between the film and some of the ideas that you are learning from the readings.  Click here to find out which team you belong to.
    1. TEAM 1 KONY 2012.
    2. TEAM 2 KONY 2012.
    3. TEAM 3 KONY 2012.

READINGS to complete for WEEK 3: Understanding Virality

READ: Hobbs, R. (2016). Powerful Propaganda: KONY 2012. Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda.

READ: Hobbs, R. (2013). The blurring of art, journalism and advocacy: Confronting 21st century propaganda in a world of online journalism. I/S: A Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society 8(3), 625 – 638.

READ: Brooking, Emerson & Singer, P.W. (2016, November). War Goes Viral: How Social Media is Being Weaponized. The Atlantic.

COMING UP!

Next class: Thursday, February 9 7 p.m. 

DUE: LEAP 1, February 9

Week 1

We define and discuss the term “propaganda” and consider its importance today. 

If you did not participate in the synchronous meeting, please watch the recording. Then answer the questions on the YouTube page by creating and uploading a video comment in the comments section.

AGENDA FOR OUR SYNCHRONOUS ORIENTATION MEETING on January 25th

  1. Introductions
  2. View and Discuss “Trust Me, I’m Lying” video
  3. View and discuss “Fake News Wasn’t the Biggest Problem”
  4. Read the syllabus and review the learning outcomes
  5. Review the content of the course
  6. Thursday 7 p.m. will be our regular F2F online class meeting time
  7. Discuss the philosophy of the class and the particular learning approach used
    • What is an “open-network learning environment”? Why are we not using SAKAI?
    • What makes online learning with digital literacy powerful?
    • What does the term, “propaganda” mean to you?
    • What do you need to do to be successful in this course?
    • How can this course benefit you?
  8. Preview homework and expectations for next week

PLEASE COMPLETE THESE ACTIVITIES BEFORE Thursday, Feb 2 at 7 p.m. 

  1. Introductions, Part 1. On the MUUT page marked “Who are You?” respond to the prompt designed to activate your early memories about propaganda in your life. You are encouraged to read and respond to the ideas of other class members. You might want to check out the User Guide for the MUUT Discussion Board so you understand how it works. Click here to establish an account.
  2. Comment: View the  video “Fake News Wasn’t the Problem” and make a comment on a key idea using the ANT Video Annotation tool
  3. View: “Look Who’s Back” on Netflix. After viewing, comment on the film’s messages about propaganda and contemporary media using the Flipgrid. Comment and respond to at least one peer. Consider these questions in your response:
    1. Describe a favorite scene in the film and explained why you liked it.
    2. Why did media producers promote Hitler?
    3. How do you interpret the ending of the film? Why did the director include this?
  4. Read the assigned readings for Week  2 (links are available below). After reading, compose a comment where you summarize and comment on some key ideas from what you learned from reading on the MUUT discussion board, “Response to Week 2 Readings.” Comment and respond to at least one peer.
  5. CREATE. Establish a Twitter account and post a message using class hashtag #COM416. Use search (on terms like propaganda, public relations, disinformation, etc) to find at least 20 interesting people to follow, including your instructor @reneehobbs.
  6. CREATE a blog for this course. Create a blog and create an About page that presents your identity. Send a tweet to the instructor with the hashtag #COM416 plus the link to your blog’s home page before Thursday, Feb 2 at 7 p.m. Need help creating a blog? Try Wix or Weebly. Or watch this video. Or check out the WordPress.com Learning page

VIEW: “Look Who’s Back.” Director: David Wnendt. NOTE: This film is available on Netflix.

READINGS to complete for WEEK 2 

READ: Jowett, Garth and O’Donnell, Victoria (2012). Chapter 1. What is Propaganda and How is it Different from Persuasion? Propaganda and Persuasion. 5th Edition. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

READ: Hobbs, R. & McGee, S. (2014). Teaching about propaganda: An examination of the historical roots of media literacy. Journal of Media Literacy Education 6(2), 56 – 67.

READ: Hobbs, R. (2016). What is Propaganda and Where to Find It. Mind Over Media: Analyzing Contemporary Propaganda.

READ:  Welch, David (2013). Chapter 1. A Much Maligned and Misunderstood Term. Propaganda: Power and Persuasion. London: The British Library. 

COMING UP!

Next class: Thursday, February 2 7 p.m. 

DUE: LEAP 1, February 9

Welcome

Welcome to #COM416: Propaganda.

This is a fully-online advanced undergraduate course with an (optional) weekly 60-minute synchronous class meeting using the Zoom video conference.

In this class, we do not use Sakai. All learning occurs on the open Internet.

Our first meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 25th from 3 – 4 p.m. To join the meeting, click here and follow the instructions. You will also receive an email with how to join from your smartphone or other digital device. For future classes, we’ll try to schedule this meeting at a time when most people can participate. Complete the Doodle poll to indicate your availability.

Order the two required books:

Welch, David. (2013). Propaganda: Power and Persuasion. London: The British Library.

Holiday, Ryan (2013). Trust Me, I’m Lying. New York Penguin.